Sanitation and disease

Poor sanitation is linked to transmission of diarrhoeal diseases such as cholera and dysentery, as well as typhoid, intestinal worm infections and polio. Poor exacerbates stunting and contributes to the spread of antimicrobial resistance.

Alternative arrangement for sewage disposal-

To improve sanitation low alternative arrangement for sewage disposal should be used. Such arrangement includes septic tanks, chemical toilets, compost pits etc.

 

 

Sanitation in public places can be maintained by:

Use of dustbins for throwing litters.

Use of public toilets for urination and defecation. Example- Sulabh.

Use of handkerchief or tissue paper while sneezing or coughing in order to prevent air-borne diseases.

 

Sanitation at public places‚Äč

 

Use of dustbins for throwing litters.

Use of public toilets for urination and defecation. Example- Sulabh.

Use of handkerchief or tissue paper while sneezing or coughing in order to prevent air-borne diseases.

Poor sanitation puts children at risk of childhood diseases and malnutrition that can impact their overall development, learning and, later in life, economic opportunities. While some parts of the world have improved access to sanitation, millions of children in poor and rural areas have been left behind